Personal tools
Questions?

434.924.3627

Document Actions
Navigation
 

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease—Adolescent

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a disorder that results from food and stomach acid backing up into the esophagus from the stomach. GERD is different ...

condition

Definition

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a disorder that results from food and stomach acid backing up into the esophagus from the stomach.

This condition can cause serious health issues. Treatment for GERD includes lifestyle changes, medications, and sometimes surgery.

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

si1347_97870_1_gerd
Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

Causes

The valve between the esophagus and stomach opens to let food enter the stomach. With GERD, the valve doesn't close as tightly as it normally should. This causes acid reflux, a burning sensation that can be felt below the breastbone.

The following factors contribute to GERD:

  • Abnormal pressure to the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), a valve that keeps food in the stomach
  • Increased relaxation of LES
  • Increased pressure within the abdomen

Risk

The following may increase the risk of GERD in adolescents:

Symptoms

Adolescent GERD may cause:

  • Heartburn
  • Regurgitation
  • Abdominal or chest pain
  • Vomiting
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Dry cough
  • Raspy voice
  • Sore throat
  • Recurrent pneumonia or worsening asthma
  • Weight loss, lack of appetite
diagnosis

Diagnosis

Your doctor will ask about your teen’s symptoms and medical history. A physical exam will be done.

Tests may include:

  • 24-hour pH monitoring—a probe is placed in the esophagus to keep track of the level of acidity in the lower esophagus
  • Short trial of medication—helps confirm diagnosis if GERD symptoms are relieved during the trial period

Images of internal body structures may be taken with:

treatment

Treatment

Treatment options vary based on the severity of the GERD. Options may include one or more of the following:

Lifestyle Changes

This may be all that is needed to relieve GERD symptoms. In some cases, these may be recommended before medication is prescribed. These changes can be tailored to an individual patient based on their habits. Lifestyle changes include:

  • Eating smaller, more frequent meals
  • Avoid overeating
  • Avoid late night meals
  • Sleeping with the head of the bed elevated
  • Avoid lying down within 2-3 hours after eating
  • Consider looser clothing that doesn't bind the stomach area
  • Lose weight
  • Quit smoking

Foods and beverages to avoid may include:

  • Chocolate
  • Fried foods
  • Peppermint
  • Spicy foods
  • Caffeine products
  • Carbonated beverages
  • Foods high in fat and acid
  • Alcohol
Medications

Medication may be needed to relieve symptoms and heal any damage to the esophagus. Many medications for GERD are available over-the-counter and by prescription. Your teen's doctor may recommend the following:

  • Antacids
  • H-2 blockers
  • Proton pump inhibitors
Procedures

In more severe cases, the doctor may recommend surgery or endoscopy.

The most common surgery is called fundoplication. During this procedure, the surgeon wraps part of the stomach around the LES. This makes the LES stronger and prevents stomach acid from backing up into the esophagus.

prevention

Prevention

There are no current guidelines to prevent GERD.

Related Doctors
Stephen Borowitz
Stephen Borowitz Gastroenterology, Nutrition: Pediatric
Nancy McLaren
Nancy McLaren General Pediatrics
Porsche Roberson
Porsche Roberson General Pediatrics
James Sutphen
James Sutphen Gastroenterology, Nutrition: Pediatric
See all Doctors >