Digestive Health Quality & Safety

At UVA, delivering the highest-quality healthcare to our patients is our top priority. Achieving our goals for safety and excellence means working continuously to improve the care we provide. Our teams meet regularly to evaluate and improve our care.

Our nationally recognized safety and quality program, Be Safe, provides a disciplined, daily framework to see and solve problems as they arise in the course of patient care.

We believe you should have this information to help you make informed decisions about where to seek care. When choosing a healthcare team, we encourage you to ask questions about the quality of care they provide.  

Sharing information about the quality of care we provide and looking at lessons learned is an important part of developing a team focus on patient safety.

Adenoma Detection Rate

Most colon cancers develop from adenomas, which are small, benign (noncancerous) polyps or growths in the colon. Colonoscopies help prevent colon cancer because endoscopists carefully search for and remove adenomas during the procedure.

One way to measure how well a clinic or center performs colonoscopies and helps patients prevent colon cancer is to track how often endoscopists find adenomas during routine colonoscopies. The adenoma detection rate is the number of colonoscopies in which an adenoma is found divided by the total number of colonoscopies performed.

We use data from the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy to compare our ADR to the average for clinics and centers across the United States.

Adenoma detection rate is one way to measure how well a clinic or center helps prevent cancer during colonoscopies.

View data table

A higher number is better.

Cecal Intubation Rate

The cecal intubation rate (CIR) is another way to measure how well a clinic helps prevent cancer during colonoscopies. During a colonoscopy, the endoscopist uses a colonoscope to carefully look for adenomas or polyps that could become cancer if they’re not removed.

When the endoscopist is able to advance the colonoscope all the way to the cecum, or beginning of the colon, that means they examined the whole colon. If the endoscopist doesn’t make it to the cecum, they may not see some polyps.

The CIR is the percentage of colonoscopies in which endoscopists reach the cecum. We use data from the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy to compare our CIR to the average for clinics and centers across the United States.

The cecal intubation rate (CIR) is one way to measure how well a clinic helps prevent cancer during colonoscopies.

View data table

A higher number is better.

Average Scope Withdrawal Time

The scope withdrawal time is the amount of time the endoscopist spends examining your colon for polyps. Longer withdrawal times often lead to higher adenoma detection rates.

We use data from the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy to compare our average withdrawal time to the average for clinics and centers across the United States.

Average scope withdrawal time measures how long the endoscopist spends examining your colon for polyps.

View data table

A higher number is better.