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Home > Services > Orthopedics > Orthopedic Conditions > Peroneal Tendinopathy

Peroneal Tendinopathy

Definition

Tendinopathy is an injury to the tendon. It can cause pain, swelling, and limited movement. The injury can include:

  • Tendonitis — inflammation of the tendon
  • Tendinosis — tiny tears in the tendon tissue with no significant inflammation

The peroneal tendons run along the outside of the ankle bone. Treatment depends on the severity of the injury.

Peroneal Tendinopathy Causes

Peroneal tendinopathy often occurs as a result of:

  • Repetitive overuse injuries which may occur from regular activities
  • Trauma to the ankle such as a sudden twisting of the ankle or foot
  • A sprained ankle that turned inward
  • Overstretching the foot

Risk

Factors that increase your risk of peroneal tendinopathy include:

  • High arched foot
  • Previous ankle sprain or injury
  • Weak ankles

Peroneal Tendinopathy Symptoms

Symptoms include pain, tenderness or swelling along the bottom of the foot or side of the ankle. You may also experience weakening or instability in the foot or ankle.

Diagnosis

Your doctor will ask about your symptoms and medical history. A physical exam will be done.

Your doctor may also need images of the foot and ankle. These may be taken with:

  • X-ray
  • MRI
  • Ultrasound
  • CT scan

Your doctor may also inject a medicine in local structures. This can help your doctor confirm what structures are causing the problem.

Treatment

Talk with your doctor about the best plan for you. Your treatment may include rest, medications, physical therapy, corticosteroid injections or surgery depending on the severity of your condition.

Prevention

To help reduce your chance of getting peroneal tendinopathy, take the following steps:

  • Avoiding activities and sports that repeatedly stress the ankle.
  • Do not put yourself at risk for trauma to the ankle.
  • Build strong muscles to support your joints.
  • Gradually increase the frequency and intensity of exercise.
  • Learn proper technique for sports and exercise.

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Content was created using EBSCO’s Health Library. Edits to original content made by Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia. This information is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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