A patient getting help with her hand muscles in the MS clinic

Multiple Sclerosis

Make an Appointment

Blurred vision, loss of balance, fatigue: The symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS) can weigh you down. Your body’s immune system attacking the nerves of your brain, spine and eyes can feel exhausting. We’re here to help hold you up.

As a patient at UVA, you benefit from the care of experts in the field of MS treatment. We’ll work together with other specialists to give you the broad range of personalized support you need. And we’ll help remove barriers to your long-term care and safety.

MS Care

We provide care for all stages of this disease, with:

  • An individualized treatment plan
  • Disease monitoring
  • Cognitive testing
  • Emotional and psychological support
  • Rehabilitation services
  • Pharmacy support

Compassionate Care for Patients with MS

Find care that focuses, not just on your disease, but on your whole experience. Learn about our patient-centered approach at the James Q. Miller Multiple Sclerosis Clinic. View multiple sclerosis transcript.

Types of MS We Treat

  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Neuromyelitis optica
  • Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis
  • Neurosarcoidosis
  • Transverse myelitis
  • Optic neuritis
  • Vasculitis
  • Autoimmune and paraneoplastic disorders
Your First Visit with Us

Patients: Bring a copy of your most recent MRI brain and spinal cord imaging on a disc. 

Providers: Send your last note, relevant CSF and serum results, MRI brain and spinal cord reports.

Questions? Read our FAQs about MS.

multiple sclerosis clinic is at the primary care center at uva

Visit the MS Clinic

You can find the James Q. Miller Multiple Sclerosis clinic in the Adult Neurology Clinic. There, you’ll have a whole team of experts working together to improve your well-being.

Get seen by an MS expert
Engage with MS Research & Resources

Access advanced treatments by participating in clinical trials.

Search clinical trials

Support ongoing research efforts to find a cure and better treatments for multiple sclerosis.

Give to ongoing research